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Photos from Cambridge Mini Maker Faire

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We had a great time at the 2012 Cambridge Mini Maker Faire. It was nice meeting up with Boston area makers, seeing their work, and hearing people explain their ideas, and the things they’ve made.

The weather was sunny and nice, not too hot, though a bit windy (and we skipped the TWO thunderstorms of the 2011 Cambridge Mini Maker Faire).

Thanks are in order:

  • Ellen Bluestein from Cambridge Science Festival puts in an enormous amount of work each year wrangling all the logistics, people, volunteers, vendors and more.
  • Gui and Molly of Artisan’s Asylum and Joe helped out with insurance and creating a funding system. In it’s third year, this is the first time we have needed to pay for anything significant. This time, we had to pay a couple hundred dollars of insurance coverage, here’s the link, if you would like to contribute to our modest expenses.
  • Shawn Wallace came up from Providence Rhode Island to staff the MAKE table, answering questions about the magazine, publications and Maker Faire.
  • Abe Shultz did a bunch of early setup work.
  • Dug North helped out with publicity, and bringing in new audience members.

There were a lot of amazing maker presenters this year, new projects, improved developments and enthusiasm were evident: Abe Shultz, Dug North, Artisan’s Asylum,  danger!awesome, DIY BIO, ACRIS, Charles Guan, Tufts University Robotics Club, Boston Area Makerbotters, Parts and Crafts, Kiwi’s Tiny Books, Electric Motorcycle, ComBot, DuckyBots, Shane Colton, and many amazing members of the MITERS community.

It was really great seeing everybody, renewing connections, and making new contacts.

If you missed out on the fun, or would like to connect with other area makers, you can like the Facebook page, join the Boston Area Maker Faire group, check out the photos in the Flickr group. Artisan’s Asylum has built an amazing space helping people learn through making while developing connections and relationships around the work. The community of makers is growing, with new organizations and opportunities all the time.

You should also check out Maker Faire, which has major festivals in the Bay Area, Detroit, New York, and lots of Mini Maker Faires worldwide. You can even make your own Mini Maker Faire.

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2012 Cambridge Mini Maker Faire

Join us for the third Cambridge Mini Maker Faire on Friday, April 20, from noon to 4pm.  We will be coordinating with the Cambridge Science Festival and their Carnival event. The Mini Maker Faire will be located on the tennis courts of Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School, right next to the main branch of the Cambridge Public Library. Check the map for specifics on the location.

Our Sponsor for the Cambridge Mini Maker Faire is Artisan’s Asylum in Somerville. You can see many makers’ projects including these: MAKE magazine, Artisan’s Asylum, 3D printing demonstrations, ToyBrain, ACRIS Lighting System, Kid contraptions + Open shop, Automata by Dug North, danger!awesome kinetic sculpture and laser-made goodies, DIYBIO- GFP, REVObots, Stuff Charles Made, tinyKart, 4pcb, Pneu Scooter, Twitch, Singing Tesla Coil, DuckyBots, CommBot, Kiwi’s Tiny Books, Pumped Up, Electric Motorcycle and more.

Early birds will find parking beneath the library and under the tennis courts. There is limited street parking. Transportation via the MBTA is good, and the site is just a few blocks away from the Harvard stop on the T with bus service to the site.

You can see past coverage of the Cambridge Mini Maker Faire on the MAKE blog. If you would like to contribute to expenses of the event, you can donate here.

Getting there: The Cambridge Mini Maker Faire is held at 449 Broadway, site of the main branch of the Cambridge Public Library, and Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School. The Cambridge Science Festival site has a map of the area with details on other events at the Carnival. Limited parking is available beneath the Cambridge Public Library, and under the tennis courts on Ellery Street.